PRESENT CONTINUOUS TENSE - ELAN INTERNATIONAL

How to use PRESENT PROGRESSIVE TENSE?

RULES

Before beginning with writing sentences and knowing the usages of Present Progressive Tenses, let us analyse some of the rules on Present Progressive Tense and then we will take a look at some sentences and sample coversation.Did you got through our lesson on Simple Present Tense?

TO HAVE

  • POSITIVE:  SUB + IS/AM/ARE + HAVE + ING + OBJECT
  • NEGATIVE:  SUB + IS/AM/ARE + NOT + HAVE + ING + OBJECT
  • INTERROGATIVE:  IS/AM/ARE + SUB + HAVE + ING + OBJECT?

Positive (TO HAVE) Negative (to have) Negative short form Yes / No questions
I am having I am not having I’m not having Am I having?
You are having You are not having You aren’t having Are you having?
He is having He is not having He isn’t having Is he having?
She is having She is not having She isn’t having Is she having?
It is having It is not having It isn’t having Is it having?
We are having We are not having We aren’t having Are we having?
They are having They are not having They aren’t having Are they having?

TO DO (ACTION VERBS) – Present Progressive Tense

  • POSITIVE: SUB + IS/AM/ARE + VERB + ING + OBJECT
  • NEGATIVE: SUB + IS/AM/ARE + NOT + VERB + ING + OBJECT
  • INTERROGATIVE: IS/AM/ARE + SUB + VERB + ING + OBJECT?

Positive (of ‘play’) Negative (of ‘play’) Negative short form Yes / No questions
I am playing I am not playing. I’m not playing. Am I playing?
You are playing You are not playing You aren’t playing. Are you playing?
He is playing He is not playing. He isn’t playing. Is he playing?
She is playing She is not playing. She isn’t playing. Is she playing?
It is playing It is not playing. It isn’t playing. Is it playing?
We are playing We are not playing. We aren’t playing. Are we playing?
They are playing They are not playing. They aren’t playing. Are they playing?

Present Progressive Tense- Usages

Usage 1

To describe an action that is in progress and in continuity of that action. For examples –

  • I am writing my assignment.
  • Are you trying to provoke me?
  • Shiwangi is preparing hot India bread stuffed with potato.
  • The children are enjoying their picnic.
  • Why are you checking my nerves?

Usage 2

To describe an action in progress but not necessarily at the time of that action. For example –

  • Are you learning computers these days?
  • She is attending English classes daily.
  • He is studying hard this year.
  • In this job, I am travelling a lot.
  • She is showing drastic changes in her behaviour this time.
  • I am cutting down on my calories to lose weight.

Usage 3

To express an action that is planned for the near future. For example –

  • We are going to Rajasthan on Diwali.
  • She is planning to get settled abroad.
  • We are taking dinner out, this evening.
  • The train is arriving in two hours.
  • Tomorrow I am going to see my doctor.
  • We are celebrating her birthday next week.

Usage 4

To express a habitual action. For example –

  • My child is grilling me with his questions throughout the day.
  • Every time my neighbours are trying to instigate me.
  • Often, she is committing errors in her assignment.
  • Parents are trying to drive their children’s life.
  • In my free time, I am listening to music.
  • Most of the times, she is whiling away her time on the phone.

Usage 5

To indicate progressive changes, trends, and developments. For example –

  • Pollution is increasing day-by-day.
  • Students are honing their English skills.
  • Rural people are migrating to urban areas for employment.
  • Schools are focusing on extra-curricular activities for students’ overall development.
  • Technology is simplifying professional life but it is making personal life complicated.
  • People are adopting western culture at a fast pace.
  • Joint family culture is decreasing day-by day.

Usage 6

To emphasise the present moment or to indicate that a situation is temporary. Examples –

  • Temperature is fluctuating in the desert during day and night.
  • After a long illness; now, he is recuperating.
  • He is working with McKinsey & company.
  • He is burning the midnight oil to score good marks.
  • There is power outage so AC is not working.
  • Doctor is treating patients carefully.

CONVERSATION ON PRESENT Progressive Tense

Sarah- Hey! Turn down the music. I am doing my homework.

Sam- I am also listening to music. 

Sarah- Don’t irritate me. I am getting disturbed. You are pissing me off. 

Sam- hahaha! I like it.

Sarah- Moooooom… Sam is playing music loudly. I am trying to study.

Sam- Mom, I am practising for my dance competition.

Sarah- No mom, he is just watching the videos.

Sam- I am trying to learn the dance steps.

Sarah- Nobody is dancing there. Some people are just screaming.

Sam- Oh god! Some people do not understand art…

FAQs around Present Progressive/Continuous Tense

What does present continuous tense mean?

Present Continuous Tense narrates an action which is being continued or going to be continued in the near future. It uses is/am/are and “ing” is added with the verb.

What is the spelling of present continuous?

When the verb ends in -e, we take off the -e and add -ing. When the verb ends in a vowel followed by a single consonant and if the last syllable is stressed, then the consonant is doubled.

How do you change a sentence into present continuous?

We make the present continuous tense form by putting is, am or are before the –ing form of the verb. 

What is the difference between present tense and present continuous tense?

There is one important difference between the simple present and present continuous tenses. The simple present tense is used to talk about things that we do all the time. … The present continuous tense is used to talk about things that are happening at the moment we are speaking. 

What is a continuous verb?

The continuous tense is formed with the verb ‘be’ + -ing form of the verb

For example:

am think+ing = am thinking

is laugh+ing = is laughing

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